marketing

Less Is Not Always More

In reading the blog of my most favorite marketing guru (Seth Godin) this morning, I realized how much truth is in the bit below. When the "bottom line" is the only consideration, do we actually end up losing "more?"

"When we add up lots of little compromises, we get to celebrate the big win. But overlooked are the unknown costs over time, the erosion in brand, the loss in quality, the subtraction from something that took years to add up.

In a competitive environment, the key question is: What would happen if we did a little better?

Organizations that add just a little bit every day always defeat those that are in the subtraction business."

When You Know, You Just Know

Over the years I have worked with many companies, large and small. One of the biggest challenges in satisfying a client (internal or external) is giving them what they want, which is not always what they need. 

Because many things in marketing and design are subjective, it is not always easy to convince clients why your idea is a good one. Because most people (no matter how intelligent) operate within the limits of their own realm of experience, it is often difficult to convince them to see things in a new way. 

If it were only as simple as reminding them why they called on you in the first place, life would be "rabbits and rainbows" for any person who gets paid for their ideas. This is why trust is probably the most valuable asset in a client-creative relationship. 

Creatives take it "personally." Whether it is your brand, your website, or your next mission statement, we work for you as if we were working for ourselves. Everything we do is meant for public consumption and we run our ideas through a grid more rigorous than any client's ever should be. This is the "money." This is what you pay for and you can be sure this is the value in whatever you receive.  

Anyone can put pretty things on paper, a website, or on a social media channel. But the hard work (the valuable work) is done before any of those things ever see the light of day. The concept, the research, the strategy, and the implementation are far more valuable than the "pretty logo." Most importantly, the life of the "pretty logo" depends on all these things. 

I can't always explain to clients why I know what I know. Is it the 25 years experience? Is it because I am paid to think of things you wouldn't? Is it that I insist on doing hours of research about your industry and competition before we even begin? Is it that my work always represents both of us? Is it because my future business depends on your success and satisfaction? Is it that I have made it my life's work to help others succeed?

It is probably a little bit of all these things, but sometimes we need you to trust that when we know, we just know. 

LG